Archive for January, 2013

A Sunny Day
January 30, 2013

Not much going on here at the moment, so not much to blog about. It is really sunny and warm which is new. It is the picture perfect SoCal end to January. Taking a few moments to feed the ducks always improves my mood. I grabbed my camera as I headed to the grocery store. Isn’t it nice that they built a lake when they put in the strip mall on the corner? As you can see there are lots of ducks to feed.

Ducks

I did get one photo that had a bit of interest, a duck was stretching his wings.

Duck

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Collar Notes
January 23, 2013

Collar-Notes

I didn’t get to much crafting this week. Not sure why. Rick cleared out his closet and set some clothes aside to take to Goodwill. Looking at the bag I remembered I need buttons for the shirt I still want to make. So I thought it wouldn’t be too wasteful to take the buttons off one shirt and toss it out. I ended up cutting up several, both for buttons and as paint and craft rags. Some were a bit thread bare to send off anyway. I noticed the collar stays, and saved those too. Then I wondered how the crisp points on the collars are sewn. As I was picking and cutting it apart I noticed how the interfacing is done. It is in two layers. The first layer is bias and sewn into the seam around the collar. The second is on grain and cut away from the neck edge 1/4″ in back and only sewn in the seam allowance for an 1″ or so at center front. Also the neck band interfacing is cut on the bias. This technique is new to me, though it may be in some of the newer sewing books. The nice thing about cutting buttons from old shirts is that they come in sets with the matching little cuff placket buttons. Now I am stocked up on button sets and paint rags. I even cut a white shirt because the fabric seemed ideal for a pressing cloth.

Now I just need to clear the cutting table to make the pattern adjustments and sew a collar like these. The double interlining may be why the collars on store bought shirts do not wear out as fast as on the shirts I make.

Tracing Paper Board
January 16, 2013

Tracing-Paper-Board

I am thinking of joining our local chapter of the American Sewing Guild. This year the group is working on making a Channel jacket using couture techniques. The leader, Jeanette, had ordered sheets of 26″x39″ tracing paper to use when making the muslin. It is a carbon like paper I remember using during my days as a cutter in various costume shops. Every shop I worked in had this paper taped to boards. I bought a sheet to make it into a board. I found the board at Aaron Bros., then went next door to Osh Hardware to look for tape. Imagine my surprise when I found duct tape with a lace design on it. I love it and it made the board so pretty. Big sheets of transfer paper make it easy to copy patterns and mark long seam lines. It will be nice to have this new tool to copy patterns, especially ones from old Burda magazines.

Needlecraft Magazines
January 9, 2013

Needlecraft-Magazines

The current issue of “Piecework” magazine has an article on “Needlecraft the Magazine of Home Arts”. I have 7 issues dated between 1928 and 1935 that I picked up in the 1980’s at an antique mall in Indianapolis. They had lots of these magazines, but I only bought ones with crochet patterns I liked. The shop owner said they were mostly being sold to people who wanted to cut them up for the Campbell soup ads. Many of the issues were probably lost. Now I wish I had bought more. At that time we were just married and money was tight. I remember spending quite a bit of time going through them all over and over and deciding on which ones I could use and afford.

The Piecework article mentions the Greek girl and Turkish boy photos but didn’t include the photos. So here they are. There was some controversy of putting the two photos on the same page since the countries were currently at war.

Greece-and-Turkey

I did make up one pattern. Here is the article and the collar I crocheted in size 100 thread. It was my first real thread crochet project and some of the leaves are twisted at the base. I remember that bothering me, now not so much. I think the blocking may have helped hide the twists.

Irish-Crochet-Neckwear

Wishing everyone a Wonderful and Creative week!

Art Deco Fashion Book
January 2, 2013

ISBN-9789054961352

This is a lovely book of drawings of 1920’s fashion. I bought this book last year at the Samuel French bookstore on Ventura Boulevard. Rick and I stop there when we are in the neighborhood. The store is a wonderful resource for books relating to theatre and film. I fell in love with this book. It has 8 to 12 little black and white drawings on at least 100 of the 408 pages. That is a lot of inspiration. There are many color pages too. This book will be big help in deciding where to place embroidery designs, such as the black rose from a previous post, on a garment. The photo above is labeled with the ISBN 9789054961352 to help with finding it online. I found a few books for a reasonable price doing a google search, but like all out of print books, some prices are exorbitant. I paid the list price, I wouldn’t recommend paying more.

Here are a few pages that I particularly like. I want to make the scalloped collar on the right and have been thinking of ways of doing the contrast edging easily. It might have to be trim, since binding scallops is not easy.

Art-Deco-Fashion-pg105

I like the hem below. This has the scallops following the embroidery.

Art-Deco-Fashion-pg127

Having the embroidery peek out on an under dress is nice too.

Art-Deco-Fashion-pg89

Many of the photos I took were really blurry. So this is all I have to share right now. I do need to stop looking at books and actually make something. That will be my resolution for this year.

Best wishes for your health and happiness in 2013.